The Missing Journaling Workflow

Of the difficulty to drop Day One

When I first heard of my Day One becoming a subscription service I – once again – started to reconsider how I want to keep my journal.

I’ve been using Day One for years and I’m really grateful for who they made regular journaling work for me. It’s hard to argue that whatever kind of journal system one employs: it’s worthless if you don’t actually use it. Continue reading

Keep your social content yours – using Drupal?

Granted, most stuff spread across various social networks doesn’t seem important.
But I must confess that, from time to time, I simply like scrolling through my timelines at Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and the like and I wouldn’t find it too cool, if all that was gone. I don’t want to talk about the actual risk of my data vanishing, rather thinking about alternatives. I remember ideas of online applications like Sweetcron, which had its primary focus on collecting the data you created across social networks and gather them in one place.

Why shouldn’t we do it the other way around? Having you own self hosted platform for Tweets, Images, Blogposts, Links, Quotes – you name it. These would be translated to some basic content types, quite similar to Tumblr. And then simple publishing options checkboxes to decide, to which social stream(s) you want to share your update. Which fantastic open source software has most of the bits and pieces readily available for exactly that? Yep, that’s Drupal.

At least to me a Social Media Hub Drupal Distribution seems really worth a shot. What do you think? Have there possibly even some efforts been made?

Fluxkraft is most definitely the project to watch when it comes to connecting various platforms and services.

Of course, thinking about mobile is crucial. Besides Drupal 8’s native mobile efforts Drupad shows, that it’s well possible to have a universal app to use with any kind of Drupal installation.

This is just some brainstroming, collecting ideas and possible tools. I’m just excited about going back to a more open and distributed web, keeping what’s yours under your control while using existing networks for distribution and interaction. And yes, removing Facebook comments in favor of Drupal’s own comment system is a step that’s overdue for me here personally.

I’d be glad to hear some opinions.